Cabinet des Fées in Print

Produced from 2006 – 2010, these three issues are now out of print.


Cabinet des Fées: A Fairy Tale Journal
Volume 1, Issue 1
Edited by Helen Pilinovsky & Erzebet YellowBoy
Prime Books, 2006
115 pages


Table of Contents

The Fool’s Doorway by Sonya Taaffe
Une Conte de Fée by Lila Garrott
The Music of Bremen Farm by Mike Allen
All for a Rose by Donna Quattrone
The River in Winter by JoSelle Vanderhooft
All My Mommies by Virginia Mohlere
Little Red by K. Eason
Owls by Maria Beliaeva
In the Woods by Máire NicAodh

Here you’ll find baubles and bling, rivers and roses, fools and fairies — you’ll encounter children who know too much and adults who don’t know when to leave well enough alone. We give you cautionary tales, tales of revenge and of the things we’ll do for love. You’ll find re-imaginings of of the traditional tales as well as several new.

In addition, we give you Child’s Play, by Catherynne M. Valente who presents a recreation and analysis of one of the Child Ballads. Our editorial for this first print issue is a condensed version of Helen Pilinovsky’s The Commodification of the Fairy Tale and we close with H.G. Wells in Fairyland, a look at H.G. Well’s surprising short story, Mr. Skelmersdale in Fairyland.

Cover art graciously provided by Charles Vess.


Cabinet des Fées: A Fairy Tale Journal
Volume 1, Issue 2
Edited by Helen Pilinovsky & Erzebet YellowBoy
Prime Books, 2007
180 pages


Table of Contents

Katabasis by Sonya Taaffe
Stranger at the Wedding by R.W. Day
The Devil Factory by Bret Fetzer
The Hiker’s Tale by Mike Allen
Giantkiller by A.C. Wise
The Tower by JoSelle Vanderhooft
Lost or Forgotten by Janni Lee Simner
Night of the Girl Goblin by Amal El-Mohtar
The Cat-Skin Coat by Jessica Paige Wick
Vox by Kimberly DeCina
The second double-sized issue of Cabinet des Fées brings you more new explorations of the fairy tale in fiction and fact. Here you’ll cross paths with ghosts and giants, imps and unicorns, discover new twists on sleeping beauties and ugly stepsisters, and explore how such geniuses as Angela Carter brought their own unique visions to bear in retelling these dark and timeless delights. Into the woods we go!

Our editorial for this issue is a condensed version of Helen Pilinovsky’s The Significant Other and our academic offerings are Reformulating Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales and Sexuality in YA Literature by Christine Butterworth-McDermott, “The Lady of the House of Love”: Angela Carter’s Vampiric Sleeping Beauty by Jamil Mustafa and From Anxious Canons to Hysterical Texts: A Theory of Literary Revision by Jennifer Banash.

Cover art graciously provided by Charles Vess.


Cabinet des Fées: A Fairy Tale Journal
Volume 1, Issue 3
Edited by Helen Pilinovsky & Erzebet YellowBoy
Prime Books, 2010
116 pages


Table of Contents

Just Like Your Grandfather by Bret Fetzer
Blackberries by Helen Ogden
The Woman of Ebonstone Hill by Marcie Tentchoff
Crossroads by Kim Kofmel
Bricks by Rebecca W. Day
The Underground by Veronica Schanoes
The Winter Bear by Caitlyn Paxson
The Rock Climber by LuviaJane Swanson
The Flavor of a Life by Virginia M. Mohlere
Lily by Catherine Knutsson
Dark of the Moon by M. Lynn Johnson
The Scraps We Make Do With by Patricia Russo

Fairy godmothers, mysterious helpers, dangerous friends and uncanny old men, lovers found and lost—the third issue of Cabinet des Fées has them all. Fairy tales span all genres; you’ll be horrified, amused, saddened and delighted by the stories inside as twelve authors share tales of magic, wonder and woe. We also take a look at commercialised passivity, and how the field’s own fairy godmothers have turned the straw of commodified fairy tales into gold by returning the powerful heroines of the original tales to their rightful place.

In our editorial, Fairy Godmothers in Fairy Tales, Fairy Godmothers of Fairy Tales, we look at how the image of the fairy godmother has shifted throughout the years from a powerful figure to one of fanciful incompetence—and back again, and dedicate this issue two of the women who are responsible for that change.

Cover art graciously provided by Charles Vess.